12 Completely Random Facts About Donald Trump

He’s filthy rich, sports a rather strange hair-do, isn’t the most graceful Twitter user, he wants to “make America great again”, and will most likely go down in history as being the most loathed controversial president in US history. Those are basic facts about the current US president. But what else? Let’s get to know the, err… lovely Mr. Trump on a more personal level.

 

1. Trump was a registered Democrat between 2001 and 2009.

2. As of November 2016, his net worth is $3.7 billion.

3. He tried to stop the building of a windfarm in Scotland because it would ruin the view from his golf resort.

4. Speaking of golf, Donald Trump owns and operates around 18 golf courses around the world.

5. Trump has been sued 3,500 times by his business partners, contractors, clients, employees, and banks.

6. Trump started his own steak company, called Trump Steakhouse. It was closed in 2015 due to violating 51 health codes.

7. Growing up, he and his siblings were not allowed to have pets.

8. Because his brother struggled with alcoholism and died in 1981, Trump does not drink alcohol.

9. At 70 years old, Trump is the oldest person ever to become president.

10. In 1988, Trump was considered as a possible running mate for George H. W. Bush.

11. Trump has 5 kids and 8 grandchildren.

12. Trump doesn’t wear a toupee. His do is an epic combover achieved by blowdrying the hair forward, folding it backward and spraying it into place.

Unusual facts about Donald Trump

“Throwback – Donald Trump” by s2ray. Click for tee shirt purchase info.

 


SOURCES:

https://www.unbelievable-facts.com/2016/10/facts-about-donald-trump.html/3

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/mar/26/scottish-government-approves-windfarm-donald-trump

https://www.aol.com/article/news/2016/07/26/10-surprising-facts-about-donald-trump/21439401/

https://www.factretriever.com/donald-trump-facts

https://www.factretriever.com/donald-trump-facts

Advertisements

5 Words With Nifty Etymologies

We say these words everyday but have you ever stopped to think about their origins? You have? No you haven’t. Liar. Below are five super common words we use all the time that have pretty darn nifty origins. Enjoy! 

This post was submitted by an anonymous contributor. Sorry, I can’t take credit for this one.

“Clue” – This word came about as a misspelling of “clew”, an old English word that meant “ball of thread”. What does a “ball of thread” have to do with clues or hints? In an ancient Greek myth, the hero Theseus used a ball of thread to find his way out of a giant maze. Just like that ball of thread, a “clue” is something that helps you find the solution to a problem.
“Loophole” – Back in Medieval times, archers would shoot at enemies through slits in the castle walls. The walls would protect the archers, but the slits allowed their arrows to fly through. These slits were called “loopholes”. Today, a “loophole” has the same general meaning: something that lets you slip through a barrier.
“Daisy” – This flower’s name comes from the phrase “day’s eye”. Daisies are called day’s eyes because they open during the day and close at night. Isn’t that sweet?
“Escape” – “Escape” literally means “out of cape”. It refers to the ancient Romans, who wore capes much more casually than we do today. If somebody was chasing you, you could get away if they grabbed your cape instead. You would “escape” them, but lose your cape (be “out of your cape”) in the process!
“Genuine” – “Genuine” comes from the Latin word “genu”, which means “knee”. Back in Roman times, a father would acknowledge that he was the true father of a newborn son by placing him on his knee. Thus, “genuine” came to mean “real” or “true”.

 

 


SOURCES:

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=clue&allowed_in_frame=0
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loophole
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/daisy
http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=escape
http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=genuine

 


This post is brought to you  by Grammarly.

Grammarly corrects over 250 types of grammatical mistakes while also catching contextual spelling errors and poor vocabulary usage. Click the banner below to get the  FREE Chrome extension.

Grammarly Writing Support

Who is the Woman in the Great Depression Photo?

If you do an internet search for “The Great Depression”, you’ll notice a repeat of the same photograph of an unkempt, forlorn woman with two children in tattered clothes by her side and a filthy infant in her arms.

This iconic image is the perfect representation of how life was for many lower class Americans in the 1930s, and the seemingly anonymous woman who became face the Depression Era was Florence Owens Thompson.

Florence Owens Thompson was born Florence Leona Christie in 1903, in Indian Territory (now Oklahoma). At 17 years old, Florence married 23 year old Cleo Owens in Missouri on February 14, 1921. The couple had 3 children together and traveled with relatives to Oroville, California where they earned their wages by working in saw mills and on farms.

In 1931, while Florence was pregnant with her sixth child, her husband Cleo died of

woman-63191_1920

“Migrant Mother”, 1936 by Dorothea Lange

tuberculosis. In 1933 Florence had another child (not sure who’s the father here), returned to Oklahoma and traveled back to California with her parents.

In California,  Florence met Jim Hill, and together they had 3 more children.  During the 1930s the family worked as migrant farm workers in California and sometimes Arizona.

In March 1936, Florence and her family were traveling on U.S. Highway 101 towards Watsonville, CA. While driving, the car’s timing chain snapped and they stopped at a large pea-pickers’ camp on Nipomo Mesa. While her husband and two of Florence’s sons went into town to seek car repair, Florence set up a temporary camp. As Florence waited for her husband and sons to return, photographer Dorothea Lange, working for the Resettlement Administration, drove up and started taking photos of Florence and her family.

This particular photograph is actually one out of six of the photos the photographer took. According to Thompson, Lange promised the photos would never be published, but Lange sent them to the San Francisco News as well as to the Resettlement Administration in Washington, D.C. The News ran the photos almost and reported that 2,500 to 3,500 migrant workers were starving in Nipomo, CA. Soon, the pea-picker camp received 20,000 pounds of food from the federal government but Thompson and her family had already moved on.

Thompson’s identity was discovered in 1978 by Modesto Bee reporter Emmett Corrigan. A letter Thompson wrote was published and titled “Woman Fighting Mad Over Famous Depression Photo.” Florence was quoted as saying:

“I wish she [Lange] hadn’t taken my picture. I can’t get a penny out of it. She didn’t ask my name. She said she wouldn’t sell the pictures. She said she’d send me a copy. She never did.”

Thompson died of “cancer and heart problems” in  California, on September 16, 1983. Her gravestone reads: “FLORENCE LEONA THOMPSON Migrant Mother – A Legend of the Strength of American Motherhood.”

BONUS FACTS: Although Florence appears to be perhaps in her early 50s, she is only 32 years old in this iconic photo.


SOURCES:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florence_Owens_Thompson

SolSource - The Ultimate Solar Cooker

Did Churchill Have A Prescription for Booze?

I’ve read many times before that Former British Prime Minister Winston Churchill received a prescription for booze so he could skirt around America’s prohibition laws in the 1930s. As clever as that all may sound, no one is entirely sure that this is true.

While on a lecture tour, in New York, 1931, Churchill was struck by a car going about 35 miles per hour as he hurriedly tried to cross the street to meet someone for dinner. He suffered a broken nose, a gash on his head, and a few broken ribs.

Even after being hit by a car, Churchill decided to continue his tour so his doctor in New York prescribed him a minimum of five shots of alcohol to possibly help him with relaxation and pain management.

The actual prescription seen below reads:

This is to certify that the post-accident convalescence of the Hon. Winston S. Churchill necessitates the use of alcoholic spirits especially at meal times. The quantity is naturally indefinite but the minimum requirements would be 250 cubic centimeters.

780w

Image from Churchill Archives Center, Churchill College

Churchill’s case is not unique as many doctors used to prescribe alcohol for all kinds of ailments. But, during the ban of alcohol in America in the 1920s and 30s, people took advantage of this and doctors did as well. Some doctors and pharmacists saw the prohibition as an opportunity to make a few extra bucks by performing “check ups” on patients and charging out the wazoo for their “medicine”.

Was this the case for Churchill?

So today’s question is: Do you think Churchill’s prescription was legit, or just a way to get trashed during the prohibition? Tell me what you think in a comment below!

Alcohol Prescription

Alcohol Prescription Flask, Amazon

BONUS FACT: Winston Churchill’s mother invented the Manhattan cocktail in the early 1870s.


SOURCES:

http://www.ripleys.com/weird-news/winston-churchill/

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/during-prohibition-your-doctor-could-write-you-prescription-booze-180947940/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manhattan_(cocktail)

6 Quick Facts About April Fools Day

So what’s the history of April Fool’s Day? Well, no one is 100% sure but some experts believe it came from a calendar change in 16th century France in which New Year’s Day was moved from April 1st to January 1st. Folks not aware of the change were referred to as “April Fools” and mocked.

Alright, so now that you know that let’s get on with the fun stuff!

1. On April Fools Day in 1996, Taco Bell Corp. ran a full-page ad in several major newspapers claiming they purchased the Liberty Bell and will be renaming it the “Taco Liberty Bell.”

2. On April Fools Day in 2008, the BBC ran a video clip of flying penguins as part of a story for its series “Miracles of Evolution”.

3. The French call April 1st “Poisson d’Avril,” or “April Fish.” French children sometimes tape a picture of a fish on the back of their schoolmates and wait for it to be discovered.

4. In the 1960s there was only one TV channel in Sweden, which broadcast in black and white. As an April Fools’ joke, it was announced that viewers could convert their sets to display color by pulling a nylon stocking over the screen.

5. April Fools’ may also be tied to the ancient Roman Festival of Hilaria – also know as Roman Laughing Day – when citizens would celebrate the vernal equinox and honor the Anatolian Earth Goddess with a day of jokes.

6. In Scotland, an April fool is called an April “gowk”.

Fun times!

April Fool's Day Pranks


SOURCES:

http://www.cnn.com/2013/08/16/world/april-fools-day-fast-facts/

http://www.seattletimes.com/entertainment/5-fun-facts-about-april-fools-day/

Can an American Be Knighted?

Can an American Be Knighted? Meh. Kind of.

Americans do receive honorary British knighthoods and damehoods. That’s pretty cool but they’re not addressed as ‘sir’ or ‘dame’, they don’t have to kneel and they don’t get the tap of the royal sword on either shoulder (bummer). Even though they don’t get the “royal treatment”, they do receive a beautiful insignia and a hearty handshake from the Queen of England. At least 91 Americans to date have been knighted including:

Angelina Jolie. Jolie was knighted honorary Dame Commander of the Most Distinguished Order of St. Michael and St. George in 2014 for her contribution to foreign policy and working to end sexual violence.

Steven Spielberg was knighted in 2001, for his massive impact on British cinema.  was knighted in 1998 for his works in entertainment.

In 2002, Rudolph Giuliani was named an Honorary Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire for his leadership during and after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks in New York.

Billy Graham was knighted  in 2001 for his international contribution to religious and civic life.

Henry Winkler was made an Honorary Officer of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire in 2011 for his services to children with dyslexia and special educational needs.

Bill and Melinda Gates have both been knighted. In 2004, Bill Gates was knighted for his business skills, contributions to technology, and also for his work on reducing poverty with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Melinda Gates was appointed as an honorary Dame of the British Empire in 2013 for her services to philanthropy and international development.

Dwight D. Eisenhower was inducted into the Order of the Bath and the Order of Merit in 1945 for his service as Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces in Europe in WWII.

 

Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush were both made a Knight Grand Cross of the Most Honorable Order of the Bath. I’m not quite sure why. I’m not trying to be funny. I’m just not finding why they received honorary knighthood for any reason other than being the presidents of the United States.

So tell me. Do you think you deserve to be knighted? If so, why? Tell me all about it in a comment below!


SOURCES:

https://www.buzzfeed.com/ukinusa/12-americans-you-probably-didnat-know-are-honora-dp3u?utm_term=.yhmWWk7Jy#.iaJEEGLkx

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/611621/Knighthood-for-Bob-Hope—but-dont-call-him-sir.html

http://articles.latimes.com/1993-12-01/news/mn-62855_1_queen-elizabeth-s-court

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_honorary_British_knights_and_dames

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2788029/angelina-jolie-meets-queen-buckingham-palace-officially-receive-honorary-damehood.html